Minding Your Business

Proskauer’s perspective on developments and trends in commercial litigation.

Rina Kim

Rina Kim

Law Clerk

M. Rina Kim is an associate in the Litigation Department and is admitted to the New York bar.

Rina is a 2015 graduate of The George Washington University Law School, where she was editor-in-chief of The George Washington International Law Review.  She also served as president of The George Washington Graduate Korean Students Association. She was a Proskauer summer associate in 2014 and interned at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the Division of Enforcement and the U.S. Deparment of Justice in the Criminal Division, Fraud Section.

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A District Court’s Discretion to Sanction Is Broad, “But For” a Causal Limitation

Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court clarified in Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. v. Haeger that even a district court’s exercise of broad discretion to impose a civil sanction for a litigant’s bad faith conduct has to be limited by a causal link. The parties in Goodyear had reached a settlement of the underlying product liability … Continue Reading

Key Lessons From the Recent Precedential Order by Federal Circuit – Jurisdiction, Mandamus, and Privilege

On November 17, 2016, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit published a precedential order denying a petition for a writ of mandamus to overturn a district court’s determination. In In re: Rearden LLC, Rearden MOVA LLC, MO2, LLC, MOVA, LLC, the defendants in the underlying case had petitioned for a writ … Continue Reading

Think Your Arbitration Award Is Final? Maybe “Look Through” It Again

The question of federal court jurisdiction over arbitration proceedings has historically led to different conclusions. A few years ago, the  United States Supreme Court clarified in Vaden v. Discover Bank that Section 4 of the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) authorizes a federal court to “look through” to the underlying controversy to determine if there is federal court … Continue Reading
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