Minding Your Business

Proskauer’s perspective on developments and trends in commercial litigation.

Tag Archives: New York Supreme Court

Timing is Everything: NY Commercial Division Updates Rule on Trial Length

On March 27, 2017, the Commercial Division of the New York Supreme Courts updated its rule on trial length, giving judges the express authorization to impose time limits, at their discretion, on different phases of trial. The goal of this amendment, first proposed by the Commercial Division Advisory Council in October 2016, is simple: to … Continue Reading

New York’s Commercial Division Requires Motion to Seal When Redacted Documents are Filed

The Commercial Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York recently adopted a new form of confidentiality order that eliminates the option to e-file documents redacted for confidentiality without a motion to seal. The new confidentiality form, which became effective on July 1, 2016, requires the “Producing Party” who originally designated the … Continue Reading

Follow the Paper “Trial” – Proposed Commercial Division Rule Seeks to Replace Direct Testimony with Affidavits

The New York Supreme Court’s Commercial Division Advisory Council has recommended a rule that it believes would substantially expedite non-jury trials and facilitate cross examination with no adverse effects. According to the Council “such a rule would highlight the availability of a practice … that has been found by some judges and attorneys to streamline … Continue Reading

First Department Finds Forum Selection Clause in Earlier Agreement Valid Despite Later Agreement Providing for Arbitration

In a 3-2 split decision, a New York appellate court determined that a forum selection clause providing for litigation in New York courts had not been explicitly terminated and thus trumped agreements to submit to arbitration in London provided in later contracts that cancelled the previous one. Thus, the appellate panel for the First Department … Continue Reading

The Most Overlooked Exception to Attorney-Client Privilege

In-house counsel often communicate with corporate management under the assumption that these communications are protected by the attorney-client privilege— absent some type of unusual and extraordinary circumstance, such as waiver of the privilege or the crime-fraud exception. A surprising number of both in-house and outside counsel, however, are unfamiliar with the longstanding “fiduciary exception” to … Continue Reading

Dueling Forums: New York Court Rejects Australian Court’s Effort to Disregard New York Forum Selection Clause

A producer and a distributor entered into an agreement to sell shoes in Australia. The contract contained broad New York choice of law and venue provisions.  When relations soured, the distributor brought suit in an Australian court, which declined to enforce either the venue or choice of law provision finding that doing so might deprive … Continue Reading

Memorializing Discovery Rulings and Different Judges for Settlement Conferences: Two Proposed Changes to New York’s Commercial Division Rules

The New York Supreme Court’s Commercial Division has developed a reputation as a forward-thinking forum at the state level for the resolution of complex business disputes. When possible, the Commercial Division promulgates rule changes to increase efficiency and lower litigant costs. This post discusses two proposed changes to the Commercial Division Rules that were recently … Continue Reading
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