Minding Your Business

Proskauer’s perspective on developments and trends in commercial litigation.

Tag Archives: State of New York

Proposed Amendment Requires Supporting Papers to Accompany TROs

Currently, the New York Civil Practice Law and Rules permit temporary restraining orders (“TROs”) to be issued without notice to the opposing party – though this practice is discouraged by most judges. CPLR § 6313(a). Notice is not required  if the moving party can demonstrate that there will be significant prejudice by reason of giving … Continue Reading

Sealing the Case: Controversy Surrounds New York Commercial Division Proposed New Rule

In late 2016, the Commercial Division Advisory Council proffered a proposed rule, Proposed Rule 11-h, which would amend Rule 216.1(a) of the Uniform Rules for Trial Courts in New York to define the “good cause” under which court records could be sealed. “Good cause” to seal court records, as defined by the proposed rule, “may … Continue Reading

NY Court of Appeals Clarifies What May Constitute a Binding Agreement in the Sale of Syndicated Loans

A unanimous New York Court of Appeals recently held that the acceptance of an auction bid for the sale of a syndicated loan may constitute a final and binding trade, even if there is language indicating that the agreement is “subject to” the execution of a mutually acceptable, written agreement. The ruling overturns a New … Continue Reading

‘October Revise’ in the NY Commercial Division

This month, the Office of Court Administration publicized three proposed changes to the NY Commercial Division Rules that received slightly less attention than the publication of the infamous Donald Trump/Billy Bush videotape and more ‘Wikileaked’ Hillary Clinton campaign emails. As with the changes we’ve discussed in previous posts, these proposed rules are designed to enhance … Continue Reading

In Top “Form” – The NY Commercial Division’s Continuous Efforts to Increase Efficiency and Reduce Litigation Costs

As outlined in previous posts, the New York Commercial Division seeks to be a forward-thinking forum that adopts rule changes aimed at increasing efficiency and decreasing litigant costs. In August, a revised Model Preliminary Conference Order form was adopted for optional use by Division judges, even though the previous Preliminary Conference Order form had been … Continue Reading

New York’s Commercial Division Requires Motion to Seal When Redacted Documents are Filed

The Commercial Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York recently adopted a new form of confidentiality order that eliminates the option to e-file documents redacted for confidentiality without a motion to seal. The new confidentiality form, which became effective on July 1, 2016, requires the “Producing Party” who originally designated the … Continue Reading

New York’s Highest Court Refuses to Expand the Common Interest Doctrine to Merging Parties

Last Thursday, the New York Court of Appeals issued a stark reminder to transactional lawyers: no matter how much “common interest” two parties may have with respect to a transaction, the common interest doctrine may not protect their communications. In Ambac Assurance Corp. v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., New York’s highest court held, in a … Continue Reading

Follow the Paper “Trial” – Proposed Commercial Division Rule Seeks to Replace Direct Testimony with Affidavits

The New York Supreme Court’s Commercial Division Advisory Council has recommended a rule that it believes would substantially expedite non-jury trials and facilitate cross examination with no adverse effects. According to the Council “such a rule would highlight the availability of a practice … that has been found by some judges and attorneys to streamline … Continue Reading

NY Court Of Appeals Rejects No-Opt Out Class Action Settlement In Shareholder Litigation

In Jinnaras v. Alfant, decided on May 5, 2016, the New York Court of Appeals rejected a proposed settlement of a shareholder class action, where the proposed settlement would have deprived out-of-state class members of a “cognizable property interest” by failing to provide a mechanism for class members residing outside of New York to opt … Continue Reading

First Department Finds Forum Selection Clause in Earlier Agreement Valid Despite Later Agreement Providing for Arbitration

In a 3-2 split decision, a New York appellate court determined that a forum selection clause providing for litigation in New York courts had not been explicitly terminated and thus trumped agreements to submit to arbitration in London provided in later contracts that cancelled the previous one. Thus, the appellate panel for the First Department … Continue Reading

The Most Overlooked Exception to Attorney-Client Privilege

In-house counsel often communicate with corporate management under the assumption that these communications are protected by the attorney-client privilege— absent some type of unusual and extraordinary circumstance, such as waiver of the privilege or the crime-fraud exception. A surprising number of both in-house and outside counsel, however, are unfamiliar with the longstanding “fiduciary exception” to … Continue Reading

Dueling Forums: New York Court Rejects Australian Court’s Effort to Disregard New York Forum Selection Clause

A producer and a distributor entered into an agreement to sell shoes in Australia. The contract contained broad New York choice of law and venue provisions.  When relations soured, the distributor brought suit in an Australian court, which declined to enforce either the venue or choice of law provision finding that doing so might deprive … Continue Reading

Memorializing Discovery Rulings and Different Judges for Settlement Conferences: Two Proposed Changes to New York’s Commercial Division Rules

The New York Supreme Court’s Commercial Division has developed a reputation as a forward-thinking forum at the state level for the resolution of complex business disputes. When possible, the Commercial Division promulgates rule changes to increase efficiency and lower litigant costs. This post discusses two proposed changes to the Commercial Division Rules that were recently … Continue Reading

New York’s Appellate Division Reinstates Attorney General’s Statutory Fraud Claim Against “Trump University”

In State of New York v. Trump Entrepreneur Initiative LLC, New York’s Appellate Division recently denied a motion by Donald Trump’ organization to dismiss a fraud claim brought by the New York Attorney General (“AG”) under Executive Law § 63(12). Aside from the fame, or perhaps notoriety, of the respondents, Trump is noteworthy in two other … Continue Reading
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