Photo of William C. Rose

William Rose is an associate in the Litigation Department and a member of the Patent Law Group. His practice focuses on patent and related litigation and strategic counseling for life sciences and technology clients. He has extensive experience litigating in federal district courts, appellate proceedings, and inter partes review proceedings. William also has substantial experience advising life sciences clients on regulatory issues. William has advised clients and litigated issues involving both small molecule and biologic drugs (both on the patentee side and the generic/biosimilar side), medical devices, and developing technologies such as CRISPR and immunotherapy. William has also written extensively on patent and regulatory issues, and devotes time to training and mentoring new associates and summer associates on topics such as Hatch-Waxman and BPCIA litigation, as well as the regulatory framework governing such litigation.

In addition to serving corporate clients, William maintains an active pro bono practice, in which he twice received the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights for obtaining highly favorable settlements on behalf of clients.

Prior to law school, William studied biomedical engineering at the University of Virginia, where he was selected as a Rodman Scholar (the honors engineering program) and worked in a laboratory researching targeted cancer treatment using ultrasound and nanotechnology, while also working as an emergency medical technician.

The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recently addressed the issue of “analogous prior art,” a patent law doctrine fundamental to the legal determination of whether a patent is invalid as obvious over the prior art. The decision illustrates the importance of carefully considering whether asserted prior art is analogous to the challenged patent, as the use of non-analogous art can result in dismissal of any obviousness argument based on that art.