Minding Your Business

Proskauer’s perspective on developments and trends in commercial litigation.

Elisa M. Cariño

Elisa M. Cariño

Elisa Cariño is an associate in the Litigation Department.

Elisa graduated from NYU School of Law, where she interned for the Honorable Edgardo Ramos in the Southern District of New York and served as the Editor-in-Chief of the NYU Review of Law & Social Change. She also studied abroad in Buenos Aires for the NYU Law in Latin America program.

Prior to law school, Elisa received a Bachelor’s degree with general honors in law, letters & society from the University of Chicago. She is fluent in multiple dialects of Spanish.

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CCP 2031.280(a): New Document Production Obligations in California Civil Litigation

Effective as of January 1, 2020, all civil litigants in California will have additional discovery burdens. The California Code of Civil Procedure now requires “[a]ny documents or category of documents produced in response to a demand for inspection, copying, testing, or sampling shall be identified with the specific request number to which the documents respond.” … Continue Reading

Will Settling Class Actions Get More Difficult in 2019?

Consumer advocates, defense attorneys, tort reformists, and trial judges are all eagerly awaiting a decision by the Ninth Circuit which all hope will clarify the process for certifying a nationwide settlement class in the Ninth Circuit. Specifically, an en banc Ninth Circuit panel will decide whether “variations in state law can defeat” predominance in class … Continue Reading

Standardized E-Filing: The Appealing New Feature of California Appellate Courts

Consistent filing and service procedures will become less of an oxymoron in California – especially for those legal practitioners who appear in the state’s appellate courts. E-filing is currently not mandatory in most cases in appellate courts, but soon will be uniformly required, except for pro-se litigants. The State’s trial courts, California Superior Courts, can … Continue Reading
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