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Proskauer’s perspective on developments and trends in commercial litigation.

Category Archives: Appellate

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Honesty is the Best Policy: Federal Circuit Affirms Vacatur of Judgment Due to Material Misrepresentations

The United State Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit recently affirmed a decision by the United States District Court for the Central District of California, setting aside a judgment and injunction in a patent infringement case due to material misrepresentations on the part of the prevailing party discovered after the final judgment was issued. This … Continue Reading

When Is Less Really More for a Patent Licensee?

In Apple v. Qualcomm, Federal Circuit Finds No Standing to Challenge Validity of a Few Patents When Many Were Licensed The development timeline for small-molecule drugs and biologics is lengthy, estimated to take between 10 and 15 years. As a result, pharmaceutical companies need to consider freedom to operate issues long before they receive FDA … Continue Reading

Uber Can’t Compel Arbitration of PAGA Claim According to California Court

On April 21, 2021, the Second Appellate District of the Court of Appeal of the State of California filed an unpublished opinion rejecting Uber’s attempt to enforce an arbitration provision that waived an employee’s right to bring a claim under the California Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA). This statute authorizes “aggrieved employees” to file lawsuits … Continue Reading

The FTC’s Enforcement Power: How AMG Reshapes the Landscape

In a unanimous opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Section 13(b) of the FTC Act does not authorize the Federal Trade Commission to seek monetary relief in the form of restitution or disgorgement, despite the agency’s redoubled practice of seeking such relief under the Act since 2012. The Court’s opinion significantly reshapes the FTC’s … Continue Reading

Circuit Split Deepens as Eleventh Circuit Holds Administrative Feasibility is Not a Requirement for Class Certification

On February 2, 2021, the Eleventh Circuit reversed the district court’s denial of class certification for failure to prove an administratively feasible method to identify absent class members. The Eleventh Circuit’s rejection of administrative feasibility as a prerequisite to certification under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23 has deepened a circuit split on the issue.… Continue Reading

No Hearing? No Money: Second Circuit Holds the Government May Not Keep Illegally Seized Rent

The Second Circuit has recently held that the Government must account for rental income it denied a property owner during a period of illegal seizure even though the Government was able to establish probable cause at a post-seizure hearing.  The appeal stemmed from a decades-long sanctions and civil forfeiture action in which the U.S. Department … Continue Reading

Circuit Split Deepens as Eleventh Circuit Rejects “Risk of Identity Theft” Theory of Standing in Data Breach Suit

On February 4, 2021, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed the dismissal of a customer’s proposed class action lawsuit against a Florida-based fast-food chain, PDQ, over a data breach. The three-judge panel rejected the argument that an increased risk of identity theft was a concrete injury sufficient to confer Article III standing, deepening a circuit split on … Continue Reading

Do All Class Members Have Standing For Mere Statutory Violations? The Supreme Court Will Decide

On March 30, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether a damages class action, is permitted by Article III of the Constitution or Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure where the majority of the class has suffered no actual injury. Notably, this is the first time the Supreme Court will apply … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Affirms Shareholders Cannot Sue Corporate Officers for Forward-Looking Projections that Don’t Pan Out

It is illegal under the Securities Exchange Act to make false or misleading statements to the investing public about material facts.  At the same time, corporations and their officers must be able to make statements about the company’s future plans, projections, and aspirations without fear of opening themselves up to claims of securities law liability … Continue Reading

Could the FTC Pass the Torch to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to Oversee the Fintech Industry?

The change in the White House administration combined with a potential ground-breaking Supreme Court decision may move the oversight and enforcement for marketing by the fintech sector from the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”).  This would be a tectonic shift.… Continue Reading

Firm’s Computer Policy Doesn’t Undermine Claim of Privilege Over “Private” Communications With Counsel

New York City apartment living can spawn interesting legal disputes when neighbors fail to resolve their grievances amicably and resort to the courts.  Sometimes these disputes bring fanfare as well as opportunities to observe traditional rules of law in action. A recent decision in the ongoing dispute between actor Justin Theroux and his neighbors (Theroux … Continue Reading

Bearing the Books and Records Burden: Delaware Supreme Court Affirms Section 220 Order in AmerisourceBergen

This past year, Proskauer’s private fund litigation blog highlighted a Delaware Chancery case adopting an expansive view in favor of parties seeking information from companies under Section 220 of the Delaware General Corporation Law. The Delaware Supreme Court recently affirmed the Chancery Court’s ruling, providing additional appellate guidance on Section 220 and endorsing limits the Chancery … Continue Reading

Key Takeaways from the Amendment to Rule 30(b)(6)

This past year has brought lots of change, including an amendment to Rule 30(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Rule 30(b)(6) governs the deposition of an organization (e.g., a corporation or a partnership) and requires, generally, that the notice of such a deposition set out with reasonable particularity the matters of examination.  The … Continue Reading

Insurers Did Not Act As Advertised in “Advertising Injury” Suit

Does coverage for liability arising out of “advertising injury” include copyright infringement suits where the insured was not alleged to have engaged in advertisement? In Superior Integrated Solutions, Inc. v. Mercer Insurance Company of New Jersey, Inc., the New Jersey Appeals Court said “yes,” affirming the trial court’s granting summary judgment for an insured.… Continue Reading

Supreme Court to Weigh in on Constitutionality of Patent and Trial Appeal Board Appointments

The Supreme Court recently granted three petitions for certiorari challenging the Federal Circuit’s holding in Arthrex v. Smith & Nephew that administrative patent judges of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) are unconstitutionally appointed. Under the Patent Act, PTAB judges are appointed by the Secretary of Commerce in consultation with the Director of the … Continue Reading

Happy Prime Day: Trump Directs Federal Government to Pursue Legislation Making E-Commerce Platforms Liable for Counterfeit Sales

In a recent post, we summarized recent developments in litigation and legislative activity concerning whether online marketplaces may be directly liable for the sale of defective and counterfeit products on their platforms. Now the executive branch has weighed in, with President Trump issuing (on Prime Day, no less) a Memorandum on Stopping Counterfeit Trafficking on … Continue Reading

Professional Relators Under False Claims Act Find No Friends in Federal Government or Seventh Circuit

Qui tam cases in American jurisprudence rely on a simple premise: help prevent nefarious actors from defrauding the government and Uncle Sam will compensate you for your efforts. With its roots in English law, the American version was adopted during the Civil War in light of alleged fraud by federal contractors skirting the proper procurement … Continue Reading

The (Potentially) Shifting Landscape of Online Marketplace Liability

Consumers are doing more and more shopping online. But when a consumer buys a product that is defective or counterfeit, are online marketplaces liable for misconduct by third-party sellers? E-commerce platforms have generally avoided being treated like their brick-and-mortar counterparts by arguing that they do not actually “sell” goods, but rather provide services (e.g., payment … Continue Reading

Recent Decisions Spotlight Arbitration Agreements in Online Delivery Service Terms and Conditions

The global pandemic has brought about countless changes, including, for many households, increased reliance on online retail and delivery services, such as Amazon. When consumers sign up for these services or place their orders, they are likely to see a notice regarding terms and conditions, which may include an arbitration agreement pursuant to which the consumer … Continue Reading

11th Circuit Rejects Litigant’s “Creative Effort” To Escape Forum Selection Clause Requiring Federal Forum

Common practice dictates that plaintiffs often prefer to be in state court – and will sometimes go to great lengths to avoid federal court jurisdiction. That was the case in Deroy v. Carnival Corporation, a recent Eleventh Circuit decision, wherein the court rejected a plaintiff’s “creative effort” to escape a forum-selection clause requiring her to … Continue Reading

HHS Can’t Force Disclosure of Drug Prices in Ads with “Blunderbuss” Rule

Among its various attempts to regulate drug prices, the Trump administration recently sought to force pharmaceutical advertisements to disclose the wholesale acquisition cost (WAC) of certain drugs. This effort was dealt a setback in June, when the D.C. Circuit found that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) overstepped its regulatory authority by compelling … Continue Reading

Federal Circuit Issues a Splintered Ruling on the Eleventh Amendment Immunity and Rule 19 Joinder Analysis

On July 24, 2020, a panel of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued splintered precedential opinions surrounding the interplay of state sovereign immunity under the Eleventh Amendment and required joinder of parties under Rule 19 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure in a patent-in-suit infringement case in Gensetix, Inc. v. Baylor … Continue Reading
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